Rachmaninoff's Vespers
Ex Cathedra, Gloucester Cathedral

The second movement, ‘Bless the Lord, O my soul’ introduced us to the mezzo soloist, Martha McLorinan. I remember that at last year’s Three Choirs Festival, singing with Tenebrae, she took the crucial solo role in Judith Bingham’s ‘A Walk with Ivor Gurney’. She impressed me then and here, in a very different musical context, I admired her singing once again. Her tone was lustrous, and she voiced the music in a gently expressive way that was entirely appropriate.

seenandheard-international.com, July 2019

Written by John Quinn

Bach's St. Matthew Passion
Ex Cathedra, Birmingham Symphony Hall

The alto aria “Erbarme dich” was sung superbly by Martha McLorinan, who beautifully conveyed the deep sorrow of the text, and the solo violin passage which opens the aria was given a gorgeous fluidity from Orchestra 1 leader Lucy Russell.

The Artsdesk, April 2019

Written by Miranda Heggie

Bach's St. Matthew Passion
Ex Cathedra, St. George's Brandon Hill

Soloists Charles Daniels, Marcus Farnsworth and Martha McLorinan were outstanding… Martha McLorinan- singing the first alto solos- had a warm expressivity notably in the aria Erbarme Dich

The Guardian, April 2019

Written by Rian Evans

Roth: A Time to be Born and a Time to Die
Ex Cathedra, The Brammell concert hall

The alto soloist, Martha McLorinan, with a richly glowing tone, had a touching Aztec cradle song- a moving interpolation; and nurtured finely the lilting setting of a tragic mini-ballad by Mary Coleridge.

The Church Times, February 2019

Written by Roderick Dunnet

Purcell's Dido and Aeneas
Sir Roger Norrington and the London Philharmonic Orchestra, Royal Festival Hall

Lucy Crowe, with honeyed tone and impeccable control, brought Belinda to life, and Edward Grint, on top form and ably supported by two malevolent witches (Martha McLorinan and Anna Harvey) and a cackling choir, cast his spells with just the right element of pantomime evil.

seenandheardinternational.com, February 2019

Written by Chris Sallon

Purcell's Dido and Aeneas
Sir Roger Norrington and the London Philharmonic Orchestra, Royal Festival Hall

Roles were such dependably pristine singers as Lucy Crowe, Miriam Allan, Benjamin Appl and, particularly, Edward Grint, Martha McLorinan and Anna Harvey as a clearly transgender Sorceress and his/her devilish little helpers.

The Times, February 2019

Written by Richard Morrison

Purcell's Dido and Aeneas
Sir Roger Norrington and the London Philharmonic Orchestra, Royal Festival Hall

A special mention must go to Miriam Allan and Martha McLorinan… as Second Woman and First Witch, conveying meaningful and confident performances… Edward Grint as the Sorceress was satisfyingly evil, as were the two witches who were deliciously malicious, with strong accurate singing from all three.

Bachtrack, January 2019

Written by Mark Thomas

Copland's In The Beginning
Tenebrae, St. John's Smith Square

Led by a solo mezzo-soprano- a step-out from the choir by a fearless Martha McLorinan.

theartsdesk.com, July 2018

Written by David Benedict

Bingham's A Walk with Ivor Gurney
Tenebrae, Hereford Cathedral, Three Choirs Festival

Judith Bingham’s very chromatic “A Walk with Ivor Gurney” concentrated on women’s voices and featured a superb solo from mezzo-soprano Martha McLorinan.

Hereford Times, July 2018

Written by Peter Fletcher

Bingham's A Walk with Ivor Gurney
Tenebrae, Hereford Cathedral, Three Choirs Festival

This music was conceived for Dame Sarah Connolly but here the role was taken, with great assurance and musicianship, by Martha McLorinan

seenandheardinternational.com, July 2018

Written by John Quinn